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2006 Professional Remodeler’s Best of the Best Design Awards

Gold Award — Best Conservatory/Sunroom
 

The Owners of this gracious c. 1826 Southern plantation home sought a spacious, light-filled, informal living room. The room was also to have a full bath and partial basement.

The exterior is lightly detailed of millwork and windows (in lieu of heavy brick on the existing). A balustraded low-slope copper roof complements the existing structure without detracting attention away from the original. Pilasters were replicated of custom moldings, copied from existing house columns. Shutters were customized down to their vane profiles and custom-welded offset pintles.
 
New designs were developed for the extensive millwork in the new room, faithful to the theme developed by the varied trimwork throughout the remainder of the house. New applications such as a plasma TV and entertainment center cabinet were incorporated into the traditional design. Pilasters and panels which appear on the exterior appear here also, scaled down ever so slightly. Trimless “hole in the wall” recessed lights are used to downplay their “modern” existence.

This sunroom addition does not look like it’s always been there, but one might think that perhaps it should have been. The new addition is a perfect marriage of old and new — vintage style, and respect for that which it adjoins, almost 175 years its junior. It gracefully sits back and continues the rhythms developed by its predecessor — in design, detail and craft. Yet, it is of its own age, and performs a function which the grand old home could never perform for its stewards — bringing in light, warmth, views, and life.

At the same time, it is not a pretentious attempt to fool one into thinking it is part of the original structure; rather, part of its continuing history of careful improvement and response to the changing needs of its occupants.

 
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